Understanding Discraft Midranges

Jul 20, '22

Hello Ledgestone fans! Discraft has provided some fantastic molds to disc golfers around the world through their sponsorship of the Ledgestone event. This program gives access to limited-edition runs, artwork and plastics. Today we’re going to bring special attention to the disc type that has put Discraft at the forefront of flying disc innovation: the midrange.

We’ve taken the time to break down each disc in Discraft’s midrange lineup so you can fine-tune your controlled shots and approach game. 


Buzzz - Discraft’s flagship disc is the Buzzz. This premiere, straight-flier will hold any line you put it on. The versatility of the Buzzz makes it the most dependable midrange on the market. Over the years, the popularity of this disc has allowed Discraft to produce some very special runs, many of which you can find on our website:


Buzzz GT - This is your classic Buzzz, but with a groove top. This natural thumb track increases grip and maximizes spin upon release. Pair that with the consistency of the Buzzz and this becomes a very special disc. These are only produced in limited runs like the Z Metallic Buzzz GT.


Buzzz SS - Players that fall in love with the flight of the Buzzz naturally keep it in their bag for a long time. Over time, that Buzzz becomes more seasoned and beat-in and flies slightly understandable with a bit more turn. That’s where the Buzzz SS comes in. For players looking for that beat-in, Buzzz flight straight out of the box with top-level glide, the Buzzz SS is a must-have. Check out some of the runs we have on the Ledgestone site:


Buzzz OS - This disc delivers the same feel as a Buzzz in your hand with added overstability. The Buzzz OS is perfect for midrange shots calling for more fade or flex-lines and is highly effective in the wind. This disc is also highly conducive for forehand throwers and advanced backhand specialists, making it extremely versatile in many situations on the course. The Z Metallic Buzzz OS will give players that signature overstable flight.


Wasp - This is the disc that led to the creation of the Buzzz. The Wasp is the Buzzz’s slightly more overstable cousin. It will fall between the Buzzz and the Buzzz OS in stability. Other than the increased fade, the Wasp also sports a beaded rim, differentiating it from the feel of a standard Buzzz. The CryZtal Sparkle Wasp combines durability with consistent fade and a beautiful shimmer while the LSWT Rubber Blend Wasp brings increased grip and minimizes ground play, all while showing off Les White’s signature artwork. 


Meteor - The Meteor is an understable disc with tremendous glide. It is perfect for turnover lines and control shots, especially in the woods. When thrown at high speeds, it can be used for hyzer-flip lines. When thrown at low speeds, it still has the stability to hold a hyzer line. There are several great runs of Meteors to choose from on the Ledgestone site:


Comet - Much like the Meteor, the Comet is understable with supreme glide that is slower than the Meteor. This means the intended flight of the Comet can be achieved at even slower arm speeds, making this a popular disc for all skill types. Straight shots, hyzer-flips, soft hyzers, massive turnovers; this disc can do it all. It is a staple in the bag of veteran Discraft pro Michael Johansen.


Drone - The Drone is a master in overstability. It will not turn over in a headwind and is a popular choice for forehand throwers and power backhand players because of the predictable fade. The Drone has a beaded rim and is very domey, giving it a deep feel in the hand. It is the midrange of choice for touring pro Andrew Presnell and is available in multiple premium plastic types.


Malta - The Malta is the 4th disc in the Paul McBeth Discraft lineup. Designed for, and by, the 5-time World Champion, this disc brings a consistent overstable finish to the end of its flight. The Malta sports a pronounced, beaded rim to ensure a smooth release while maintaining a low profile in the hand. It can be found in Big Z and ESP Swirl.


Sol - The 2018 Discraft Ace Race disc found a major supporter in 5-time World Champion Paige Pierce and has become a permanent part of the Discraft lineup as the Sol. The Sol is an understable disc with extreme glide, perfect for turnovers and controlled shot-shaping. Check out the Paige Pierce Z Sol for the standard, popular flight or the Z Metallic Sol for a tiny bit of added stability.


Nebula - At its core, the Nebula is an overstable midrange capable of fighting strong winds. It was released in 2008 as Discraft’s Ace Race prototype and eventually became the predecessor to the Buzzz OS. Since then, the Nebula’s production has been discontinued at Discraft until our limited, 2,000-disc release. Expect the 2022 Ledgestone Big Z Nebula to fly with a standard Buzzz flight and an overstable finish, but without the super overstabilty of a Buzzz OS.


Hawk - The Hawk is a straight-flier and a perfect midrange choice for new players. Known for its glide and controllable speed, the Hawk can thread tight fairways and carve through the woods. Now out of production, it can be found in Big Z plastic.


Impact - This low-speed, understable midrange is a popular choice for newer players because of its glide and neutral flight. At higher speeds, players can achieve long turnovers, while slower speeds will produce consistent, straight flights. Now out of production, the limited-edition Impact can be found in the Z Swirl plastic.


Glide - Discraft’s most-understable midrange is the Glide. It has extreme understability and will slice right on a right-handed backhand throw. Hyzer-flips and flat releases are common for the Glide, making this disc perfect for newer players looking to get extreme understable movement from a backhand shot. 


Archer - The 2016 Discraft Ace Race disc found a home in the midrange lineup as the Archer. This understable midrange is very controllable for newer players and is perfect for hyzer-flip lines and carving up fairways in the woods. Players will notice strong glide from the Archer with or without a lot of power.

Blog by Jacob Arvidson